Support the Work

If you have found the information on this blog useful, enjoyable, candid, or inspirational ... help keep it reader supported, journalistically driven, available to all, and advertiser-free. If you are able and inspired to do so, please consider a subscription to this blog. You can drop a dime or two every month, every year, or whenever you feel moved.

It will keep me writing, gathering facts, and interviewing the experts.

Love,

Elisabeth

CLICK HERE TO SUPPORT THE WORK

Parent / Sponsor

 

 

NEED TO FIND SOMETHING?
Join The Email List

Get Tastiness to Your Inbox

* indicates required

HAVE A QUESTION? > Quinoa inflammatory issues

I am also a quinoa "victim." I discovered early on that I got a painful upper stomach pain and cramping after tasting it. I have tried to avoid it but just this week a 12-grain bread has caused me much discomfort... and after checking ingredients quinoa was on the list. Some breads, like Ancient Grain- types, promote the fact that they contain quinoa, but I am a little concerned that it is sneaking into multigrain products. So quinoa sufferers, check those ingredient lists!
October 21, 2016 | Unregistered CommenterChris
I, indeed, also have an issue with Quinoa AND Oats. Oats were my favorite food for years (I literally lived on cereals, granola bars, oatmeal cookies, steel cut oats, etc.). And I adored the taste and texture of quinoa salads.

Although I am 100% gluten, oats and quinoa free now, I began the process slowly, trying to clean up my diet and minimize it (I now know that doesn't work). During this time, I began to pay more attention to stomach/ intestinal discomfort. I actually never experienced pain or discomfort with gluten/wheat (i.e., eating pizzas/bread/donuts, etc.), but the next day my mood and irritability were clearly affected. It seemed to be affecting my brain more than my gut (clearly the inflammation was crossing the blood/brain barrier).

During the transition to remove gluten, I switched over to oats and quinoa (knowing they were great gluten free "go to" grains). HUGE mistake. Even though the gluten didn't cause discomfort, I began experiencing severe pain when eating either the oats or quinoa. I thought that perhaps it was cross contamination and made sure that I purchased them "certified gluten free". Still no go. I was absolutely doubled over in pain with either Quinoa or oats.

I have to conclude that I actually damaged my gut by consuming too much oats over the years. Perhaps I even created my gluten issue from damage done by overindulging my beloved oats. It's heartbreaking when friends or family prepare or purchase a gluten free dessert or salad just for me - that has oats or quinoa. I never want to hurt their feelings, but the discomfort from even just taking a small "courtesy bite" leaves me doubled over. I have to read the label on every box of "Gluten free" cereals, crackers, cookies, granola bars, etc., because they tend to be hidden almost everywhere. The more I clean up my diet, the more sensitive my stomach has become to inflammatory foods. Oh well. At least I am learning to dial in to foods that cause a negative reaction to my body and remove them one by one. I suppose that I should remove corn and rice next, but I still really enjoy them and they don't seem to cause any issue whatsoever. At least not yet. Knock on wood.
July 12, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterHS
I have started to notice if I eat a lot of quinoa, I tend to get cramps and headaches! For me amount seems to be key. If I have a tiny bit it isn't an issue but if I eat a lot of quinoa tabouli, I'm quite miserable. I do avoid gluten because of inflammation symptoms - sore joints and psoriasis flare ups. Guess quinoa is off of my list as well.
July 2, 2018 | Unregistered CommenterAndrea